Winter 2016 Health Link Online

HealthLink Online

Uniting Children, Parents, Caregivers, and Health Professionals

Many young children ride tricycles. Between January 2012 and January 2014, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission collected data that showed an estimated 9340 trike riders were injured seriously enough to come to a hospital’s Emergency Department. Fifty-two percent of these injured children were between 1 and 2 years of age.

The number of children with tricycle injuries peaked at 2 years of age. Somewhat fewer children who were 3 years of age were injured. For 4 year olds, the number dropped to slightly more than half the number for 3 year olds. Thereafter, the numbers of children with trike injuries declined sharply. Most of the injured children were treated and released from the Emergency Department. 

Lacerations (cuts) were the most frequent type of injury. The face was cut more often than other body parts. Internal organ damage was a common injury for 3 year olds and 5 year olds. The brain was the most commonly injured internal organ. Note in the photo the children need to wear helmets. For 7-year-old children, 70% of the injuries were bruises of the face and head. Elbows were the most commonly broken bone.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 44% of young children less than 5 years of age have already had tooth de-cay.  Tooth decay causes eating, speaking, learn-ing and behavior problems for young children.  Yearly, children in the United States miss over 51 million hours of school due to dental pain.

Question: What determines whether a food is a fruit or a vegetable?  

Answer: Fruits are the part of a plant that has seeds. Vegetables are the edible portion of a plant such as roots (carrots), leaves (lettuce), stems (celery) or flowers (broccoli). They are usually from a plant with a soft (not woody) stem.

In August of 2013, ECELS received a 3-year federal quality improvement grant. The purpose of the grant is to show how to improve the care of infants and toddlers in child care centers.  ECELS staff and expert consultants developed an observation tool. The tool measures 13 selected standards in Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 3rd edition (CFOC3).