Using the new, 5th Edition of Model Child Care Health Policies, develop customized health and safety policies for your center or home-based program. Complete self-assessment questions and review selected policies.  Submit one policy of your choice to ECELS for review. PA child care practitioners may submit completed work for review for credit by scanning the pages and attaching them to an e-mail, sending them by fax or by surface mail to ECELS. Be sure to follow the instructions in the “Important Reminders” box next to the list of self-learning modules on this webpage. K7-C3-76 or K8-C3-92. Meets STAR 2 Performance Standard for Health and Safety.  Instructions updated 1/15/14.

This document has been integrated into Model Child Care Health Policies, 5th edition. Use this link to access the PDF on the ECELS website. The hard copy, printed version is available from the PA AAP Bookstore. 10/2013

In partnership with the national American Academy of Pediatrics, Healthy Child Care America program, ECELS presented a webinar with a simultaneous audio conference, “Using Model Child Care Health Policies to Improve Quality” on February 12, 2014. This event was for early education and child care teachers/caregivers, health professionals, child care health consultants, child care health advocates, technical assistance consultants & child care agency/organization staff members.  Handouts are posted below to download. They include the PowerPoint slides, the evaluation form to submit for CME/CEU, PA Key and Act 48 credit,  a cross-walk of the Model Child Care Health Policies, 5th edition with the high priority national health and safety standards in Stepping Stones 3rd edition, and a list of Environmental Rating Scale items with health and safety content. The recording of this audio conference and webinar is with the archived webinars on the Healthy Child Care America website.

In partnership with the national American Academy of Pediatrics, Healthy Child Care America program, ECELS presented a webinar with a simultaneous audio conference, “Using Model Child Care Health Policies to Improve Quality” on February 12, 2014. This event was for early education and child care teachers/caregivers, health professionals, child care health consultants, child care health advocates, technical assistance consultants & child care agency/organization staff members.  Handouts are posted below to download. They include the PowerPoint slides, the evaluation form that Pennsylvania users may submit for PA Key and Act 48 credit, a cross-walk of the Model Child Care Health Policies, 5th edition with the high priority national health and safety standards in Stepping Stones 3rd edition, and a list of Environmental Rating Scale items with health and safety content. The recording of this webinar is with the archived webinars on the Healthy Child Care America website.

Molds grow quickly in moist areas. They are a potent cause of allergy symptoms. Quick response to moisture collections is key. Clean up mold and moisture on hard surfaces with water and a detergent, then dry the surfaces so no moisture remains. Remove surfaces that cannot be completely cleaned.

Pay attention to the humidity of the air. Hardware stores sell inexpensive devices that measure humidity levels. Aim for an indoor humidity between 30% and 60%. Dehumidifiers remove moisture from the air. Use them where needed to keep humidity in the healthful range. For more information about how to safely clean mold and manage moisture in educational facilities, go to the Environmental Protection Agency website: http://www.epa.gov/mold/index.html. Some of the materials are available in Spanish as well as in English.*

The National Center on Health offers visually attractive, simply stated resources for infant, toddler and preschool care. Anyone can down-load the electronic copies from the Internet. Head Start programs can order hard copy from the National Center at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. These materials have excellent content for teachers/caregivers to use in their programs and to share with families:

Growing Healthy Flipcharts http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/healthy-active-living/HAL_Resources/NCHEnglishFlipChartF011514_7-7final508.pdf

Take a look at the National Center’s Health Tips (Fact Sheets) for Families* (and teachers): Download an individual one page fact sheets when you need a handout on one of the topics or download the complete series in English [PDF, 1.2MB] and Spanish (español) [PDF, 309KB]* The following topic are available as handouts:

Active Play includes tips to help infants, toddlers and preschoolers develop positive active play behaviors.

Health Literacy provides information about how to understand and use health information that doctors and other health professionals give.

Healthy Breathing provides information about eliminating first-hand, second-hand and third-hand exposure to tobacco smoke.

Healthy Eating offers easy tips to help infants, toddlers and preschool-age children learn healthy eating.

Mental Health provides information about how to help infants, toddlers and preschoolers develop positive mental health behaviors.

Oral Health offers tips to promote oral health in infancy through preschool age.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Tips for Families (2 pages) provides easy tips families can use to ensure their children's health and safety at home, outside, in the water, and in a car or truck.

Dealing with Stress is a 4 page guide with simply stated, clear tips to help cope with stress in a healthy way.

*http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/health-literacy-family-engagement/family-education/tipsheetfamily.htm

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has a food label to tell consumers that the producer of the food meets certain standards. Some multi-ingredient products with USDA Organic labels specify which ingredients have been certified organic according to the USDA standards. The standard for use of the USDA Organic label requires that the producer not use synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, irradiation, or genetic engineering. To enforce the standards, the USDA inspects the production of foods that use the label.

Food labeled USDA Organic may or may not be healthful. There is no evidence that foods are necessarily less healthful if grown with synthetic fertilizers or properly aged sewage sludge. Irradiation of food kills germs. No radiation remains in the foods. Foods produced by genetic engineering may grow better and produce quality product sooner than if the producer waited to select plants from natural mutations. How a food is grown and packaged is not the only way to decide whether the food is healthful. The time between picking and selling foods can affect the quality of any food. Contamination or improper storage of any food may occur on the way from harvest to the seller.

This pest control website of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) includes an extensive list of pest management resources, with special materials about Integrated Pest Management in child care as well as handouts to download and distribute to parents and staff about the effect of pesticides on children. 12/2012

This one page fact sheet gives general information about managing poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac in young children for parents and caregivers. Updated 2004. Reviewed and reaffirmed 11/2012

See the online (most recently updated) version of Caring for Our Children, 3rd edition for the national stanards related to cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting surfaces in child care settings. Details about how to select a sanitizer and disinfectant are in Appendix J. The table that lists Routine Schedule for Cleaning, Sanitizing and Disinfecting is in Appendix K . Updated 12/2013