• Animal Visits
  • Transitions: Hand Washing to Eating
  • Autism Resources
  • Mold and Moisture
  • Toddlers and Preschoolers: Help parents form positive parent-child relationships
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder-Are We Doing All We Can?
  • Food Preparation Techniques for Tasty & Healthful School Meals
  • Diaper Rash Prevention and Management
  • Staff Health Risk in Pregnancy

Swaddling (wrapping tightly) in a blanket calms many young babies. However, improper use of this practice increases risk of harm. If the blanket is too loose, it can move up to cover the infant’s face. Loose blankets around the infant’s head are a risk factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.) Swaddling may cause overheating, another SIDS risk factor. If the blanket wraps the legs so they are not free to move, researchers find the baby is more likely to develop hip disease. 

Do you or the families you serve transport children? Review performance standards for transporting children safely in early care and education programs. Share this information with parents who transport their children in vehicles other than a public bus. The model policy is consistent with Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards.

Common myths and scientific evidence about currently recommended vaccines are discussed on the website of the Vaccine Education Center of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. The Vaccine Education Center is funded by civic-minded donors, not pharmaceutical companies. View the facts about vaccines. Download information sheets for staff and parents, including one about common vaccine myths. Reviewed and reaffirmed 4/2018.

Early care and education staff members must check children's immunization records to be sure that the children are up-to-date and protected against vaccine-preventable diseases. This task requires looking at the record and understanding the abbreviations for the required vaccines. Vaccine products for children may contain single vaccines (protection against a single disease, e.g. Hepatitis b) or multiple vaccines (protection against multiple diseases, e.g. MMR for measles, mumps, rubella). These multiple vaccines are often called "combo or combination vaccines". Different vaccine manufacturers may produce either single or combo vaccines. Click here for the CDC website or put http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/vaccines-list.htm in your browser to view the names and components as well as learn more about vaccines in current use. Reviewed and reaffirmed 2/2019

“Vaccines and Your Baby” is a 28-minute video that explains the basics of vaccines. You’ll learn about vaccines and how they work, the science behind vaccines, immunity, and the 11 diseases that vaccines prevent. Parents of children who suffered vaccine-preventable diseases tell their stories. You may watch the video on line. Go to www.vaccine.chop.edu. To watch the video, just click on any section you wish to view. To watch the video from beginning to end, click on the first section and follow the prompts to each section that follows. If you prefer, you can download the entire video to your computer link on the webpage of the Vaccine Information Center.