Mosquitoes may carry serious diseases. West Nile Virus is present in Pennsylvania. Mosquitoes are spreading Zika virus in the US. Health departments in Pennsylvania are working to eliminate standing water where mosquitoes breed. Chemicals that kill mosquitoes are being used to treat some areas. Spraying may be done from the ground or from the air in larger areas. If your facility or child care home is located near a spray area, remain indoors while spraying is being done. Close windows, and turn off ventilation systems that draw-in outside air during and 30 minutes after spraying ends.

The National Center on Health offers visually attractive, simply stated resources for infant, toddler and preschool care. Anyone can down-load the electronic copies from the Internet. Head Start programs can order hard copy from the National Center at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. These materials have excellent content for teachers/caregivers to use in their programs and to share with families:

Growing Healthy Flipcharts http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/healthy-active-living/HAL_Resources/NCHEnglishFlipChartF011514_7-7final508.pdf

Take a look at the National Center’s Health Tips (Fact Sheets) for Families* (and teachers): Download an individual one page fact sheets when you need a handout on one of the topics or download the complete series in English [PDF, 1.2MB] and Spanish (español) [PDF, 309KB]* The following topic are available as handouts:

Active Play includes tips to help infants, toddlers and preschoolers develop positive active play behaviors.

Health Literacy provides information about how to understand and use health information that doctors and other health professionals give.

Healthy Breathing provides information about eliminating first-hand, second-hand and third-hand exposure to tobacco smoke.

Healthy Eating offers easy tips to help infants, toddlers and preschool-age children learn healthy eating.

Mental Health provides information about how to help infants, toddlers and preschoolers develop positive mental health behaviors.

Oral Health offers tips to promote oral health in infancy through preschool age.

Safety and Injury Prevention: Tips for Families (2 pages) provides easy tips families can use to ensure their children's health and safety at home, outside, in the water, and in a car or truck.

Dealing with Stress is a 4 page guide with simply stated, clear tips to help cope with stress in a healthy way.

*http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/tta-system/health/health-literacy-family-engagement/family-education/tipsheetfamily.htm

This organization provides updated, practical information on the management of lice and scabies infestations, emphasizing the need to avoid harmful applications of pesticides. Click here for the website with practical tips and tools to address a lice outbreak in group care. 12/2012

 

  • New Thinking about Asthma
  • An Influenza Reminder
  • Easier Way to Check Health Records
  • Snacks and Drinks 

 

 

Early education and child care professionals should include preventive practices in the curriculum. In addition, early educators have many opportunities to notice possible areas of decay on children’s teeth. Coupling prevention and early recognition of possible trouble with referral to an oral health professional can save significant suffering. Early decay looks like dull white bands on the smooth surface of the tooth at the gum line. It is caused by bacterial activity in the mouth. It is a form of infectious disease. Early decay may be reversible with fluoride treatment and removal of plaque that builds up on the teeth. If this early decay is not treated, it becomes yellow, brown or black spots. These spots are places where decay destroyed the tooth enamel. If you see chalky white spots or discoloration on a child's teeth, urge the child's family to take the child to a dentist as soon as possible.

Use this FREE interactive online activity to learn about preventing and managing infectious diseases. Four experts who are pediatricians and members of the PA Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (PA AAP) collaborated with the national AAP to prepare the module.

Users must create a log in to enter the AAP online e-learning system called Pedialink. Thereafter, Pedialink will recognize your log-in to use modules. The AAP does not charge anything at check-out for FREE modules. The AAP issues a certificate awarding 3 hours of credit for successful completion of the module. For the log in and this online learning activity, go to the Healthy Child Care America, Healthy Futures website. 

DPW Facility Licensing Representatives and STARS Specialists will recognize the AAP certificate of credit. To have ECELS record the credit in your PA Keys PD history, attach a scan of the certificate to an e-mail, fax, or send a copy of the AAP certificate to ECELS. Follow the instructions in the “Important Reminders” box on the self-learning module pages of the ECELS website to order a self-learning module review by ECELS. ECELS requires a $10 administrative fee to process your request. (ECERS-ITERS: Personal Care Routines, Parents and Staff. K7-C2-84. 6/2017

 

State regulations require documentation that the child has received vaccines and screening tests according to the recommendations of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Any document (including an electronic printout from the child's medical record) that provides this information is acceptable. The Office of Child Development and Early Learning (OCDEL) offers a form that allows health care providers to say whether the child is up to date, the CD 51. This Child Health Report form was last revised in 2008. It does not require the dates and results of the recommended screening tests. It has a check box to indicate "yes" or "no" that the child has received all the recommended screenings. The only screening information it requests is the results of any abnormal vision, hearing or lead screening. These are important, but not all the screenings that assess whether a child is healthy and ready to learn. 

Families, staff members and health professionals can help control infectious diseases among children and adults involved in group care settings. Each has a role. The three roles described in these fact sheets overlap. Families, staff members and health professionals benefit from ongoing coordination and collaboration with one another. Sharing these fact sheets may help those whose role is defined in them identify ways to contribute to reducing illness. Revised 4-2019

See the online (most recently updated) version of Caring for Our Children, 4th edition for the national stanards related to cleaning, sanitizing and disinfecting surfaces in child care settings. Details about how to select a sanitizer and disinfectant are in Appendix J. The table that lists Routine Schedule for Cleaning, Sanitizing and Disinfecting is in Appendix K . Reviewed and reaffirmed 5/2019.

 

Head lice are little insects that live and lay their eggs close to the scalp. They bite and then feed on blood they draw. They glue their eggs (nits) to the hair. The eggs must be within ¼ of an inch of the scalp to hatch. Small pieces of dandruff are often mistaken for lice eggs. Dandruff slides off hair easily. The tightly-glued eggs are very hard to remove. Combing to remove the lice and nits is tedious. Lice spread easily in group care settings, mostly by head-to-head contact.