The attached ECELS Health and Safety Checklist includes references. It was updated December 2011 as Version 1.4. This tool guides the user to the appropriate national health and safety standard(s) and other related references for each item. Each item is cross-referenced with corresponding topics from: Caring for Our Children:  National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 3rd Edition, 2011 (CFOC) , the Environmental Rating Scales (ITERS-R, Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale - Revised Edition; ECERS-R, Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale - Revised Edition); and the Pennsylvania Child Care Facility Licensing Regulations.

The U.S Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) allows safer products to use the Design for the Environment (DfE) label on products that help protect the environment and are safer to use. The DfE scientific review team has screened each ingredient in these products for potential harmful effects on humans and the environment. Based on what is known, the product contains the least harmful ingredients among chemicals of the type used for the purpose for which the product is being sold. The EPA lists products on its website that have met the DfE criteria. 12/2012

  • When Parents Won’t Immunize 
  • Halloween Safety 
  • BMI 
  • Kidney Bean Toxicity 
  • Infant Care Issues 
  • Safety Around Dogs 
  • Talking About Violence and War 
  • Indoor Surfacing  
  • Napping in Child Care Facilities
  • Indoor Air Pollution
  • Obese Preschoolers
  • Fluoride Varnish
  • Isolating Ill Children?
  • Seasonal and H1N1 Influenza Update
  • Spring 2009 Professional Development for Child Care Health Consultants
  • Honoring CCHC Janice Maker
  • Free Kit—Activities, Games & More: Go Out and Play!
  • Organic Foods: Are They Better?
  •  IOM ‘Weighs In’ About Sleep and Obesity
  •  New Online Self-Learning Module—Common Illnesses
  • Social Emotional Development
  •  Pediatricians & Early Educators Share Developmental Screening
  • TICKS Spread Disease
  •  BATS!! - A Health Policy Test

 

  • Bottles, Pacifiers and Sippy Cups Cause Many Injuries 
  • 2012-2013 Flu Vaccine Recommendations 
  • Violence: How to reduce its impact on children 
  • Let’s Move! Child Care Activity Calendar 
  • Asthma Devices 
  • Insect Bites and Stings in the Fall 
  • Special Care Plans—Braedon’s Story 
  • ADHD Treatment for Preschoolers 
  • Emergency Preparedness Manual
  • Influenza Vaccine for 2015-2016
  • Screen Time, Child Development and Nutrition
  • Organic Food – Is It Healthier?
  • Background Music and Noise Interferes with Language Learning?
  • Oral Health Screening Added to Routine Well-Child Visit Schedule
  • National Center on Health—Materials All Early Educators Can Use
  • Increasing Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs
  • Three Newly Revised and a List of All ECELS Self-Learning Modules
  • Eating Together - Mealtime Matters

This fact sheet offers general information for parents/legal guardians and caregivers about managing a child with a fever. Updated 11/2012

If you see a tick on a child – stay calm.  Use a blunt, fine-tipped tweezers to remove it.

Grasp the tick’s body as close to the child’s skin as possible. Pull the tick slowly and steadily out of the skin. Do not squash or break its body. Do not twist or jerk the tick.
Wash the bite area with soap and water.
Inform the parents/guardians you have removed a tick. Ask them to watch the bite area for a rash. Teachers/caregivers should check the bite area each day too.

The child needs medical care if a rash appears or the child becomes ill.

PA regulations require that children have vaccines recommended by the ACIP.* The ACIP is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. The ACIP recommends that everyone older than 6 months of age receive influenza vaccine.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that child care programs prevent influenza with annual immunization for everyone older than 6 months of age, especially all teachers/caregivers.** ECELS urges programs to adopt policies and practices that require influenza immunization, hand hygiene, cough/sneeze etiquette, and minimizing crowding.