• Children Left in Vehicles 
  • First Aid Corner 
  • New Choking & CPR Guidelines for Children 
  • Sun Protection—Use the UV Index 
  • Caring for Our Children, 3rd Edition 
  • Nutrition: MyPlate Replaces MyPyramid 
  • Food-borne Illness 
  • Using Online Professional Development 
  • Head Bumps Matter-Protecting Young Brains 
  • Insect Bites & Stings: 2011 Advice 
  • Swimming & Water Safety 
  • New Seat Restraint Recommendations

 

  •  Heat-related illness
  • Healthful Snacks
  • Vinegar as a Cleaning Solution
  • EPA Healthy Child Care Information
  • A New Website for ECELS
  • Drink Fluoridated Water
  • ECELS Technical Assistance & Professional Development Team
  • Tick Bites
  • Art Products Need the AP Seal

 

  • Animal Visits
  • Transitions: Hand Washing to Eating
  • Autism Resources
  • Mold and Moisture
  • Toddlers and Preschoolers: Help parents form positive parent-child relationships
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder-Are We Doing All We Can?
  • Food Preparation Techniques for Tasty & Healthful School Meals
  • Diaper Rash Prevention and Management
  • Staff Health Risk in Pregnancy

Go to the ECELS Sun Safety Online Self-Learning Modulec. Scroll to pages 40-43 of the module for a list of links to credentialed sources of sun safety information. 12/2012

The attached document provides helpful tips to support the child, parents and early care and education staff when there is child abuse and neglect. For more information and professional development about child abuse and neglect (child maltreatment,) see the online ECELS Child Abuse and Neglect Self-Learning Module. 5/2012

Swaddling (wrapping tightly) in a blanket calms many young babies. However, improper use of this practice increases risk of harm. If the blanket is too loose, it can move up to cover the infant’s face. Loose blankets around the infant’s head are a risk factor for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS.) Swaddling may cause overheating, another SIDS risk factor. If the blanket wraps the legs so they are not free to move, researchers find the baby is more likely to develop hip disease. 

Early educators have a vital role in the lives of children. What teachers/caregivers do can directly impact each child’s health and wellbeing. Teachers need the knowledge, skills and tools to meet this awesome responsibility! ECELS recently revised three self-learning modules so they are now updated and easy-to-use in online or print formats:

Each module meets STAR Level 2 Performance Standards for Health and Safety and provides 2 hours of professional development credit. See the brief overview of each module below, click on the active link above or go to the ECELS website at www.ecels-healthychildcarepa.org Select the Professional Development/Training tab at the top of the page, then Self-Learning Modules. Find the one you want to use in the alphabetical listing of the more than 30 Self-Learning Modules that ECELS offers.

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Do you or the families you serve transport children? Review performance standards for transporting children safely in early care and education programs. Share this information with parents who transport their children in vehicles other than a public bus. The model policy is consistent with Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards.

Many young children ride tricycles. Between January 2012 and January 2014, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission collected data that showed an estimated 9340 trike riders were injured seriously enough to come to a hospital’s Emergency Department. Fifty-two percent of these injured children were between 1 and 2 years of age.

The number of children with tricycle injuries peaked at 2 years of age. Somewhat fewer children who were 3 years of age were injured. For 4 year olds, the number dropped to slightly more than half the number for 3 year olds. Thereafter, the numbers of children with trike injuries declined sharply. Most of the injured children were treated and released from the Emergency Department. 

Lacerations (cuts) were the most frequent type of injury. The face was cut more often than other body parts. Internal organ damage was a common injury for 3 year olds and 5 year olds. The brain was the most commonly injured internal organ. Note in the photo the children need to wear helmets. For 7-year-old children, 70% of the injuries were bruises of the face and head. Elbows were the most commonly broken bone.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is a government organization. It is charged with protecting the public from unreasonable risks of serious injury or death from consumer products that pose a fire, electrical, chemical, or mechanical hazard or can injure children. This website has a wide range of reliable safety information. You can search for a topic or browse many interesting articles. On the home page, select “What’s Popular” to find excellent materials for early educators and families with children. For example “Childproofing Your Home” is a printable brochure that lists 12 safety devices to install to protect children. 12/2012