Visit the Early Learning GPS (Guiding Parents Smoothly) website. Pennsylvania’s Promise for Children campaign developed it. The GPS offers information for parents of young children about helping their children learn and grow.

The attached ECELS Health and Safety Checklist includes references. It was updated December 2011 as Version 1.4. This tool guides the user to the appropriate national health and safety standard(s) and other related references for each item. Each item is cross-referenced with corresponding topics from: Caring for Our Children:  National Health and Safety Performance Standards, 3rd Edition, 2011 (CFOC) , the Environmental Rating Scales (ITERS-R, Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale - Revised Edition; ECERS-R, Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale - Revised Edition); and the Pennsylvania Child Care Facility Licensing Regulations. Reviewed and reaffirmed 6/2018.

Many indoor and outdoor activities help children’s brains and bodies grow.  They can provide large and small muscle physical activity children need.  Activities can help children make friends, be creative and control their actions. Also, activities can enable children to use information they’ve learned before to learn new things, focus and think through ideas before acting on them. These processes are called the “executive functions" of the brain. The Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University  compares executive functions to air traffic control at a busy airport. The link to the Center on the Developing Child  is http://developingchild.harvard.edu/index.php?cID=520.

  • Promoting Social-Emotional Health 
  • Developmental Screening 
  • Playground Safety: Professional Development and CPSI Inspections 
  • Protective Play Surfacing Regulation 
  • Child Care Health Advocates Share Great Ideas 
  • Use Car Seats Only for Vehicular Travel 
  • Peanut Allergy and Cleaning 
  • Food Allergy Action Plan and Form 
  • Medication Administration: PA Child Care Facility Survey
  • Bottles, Pacifiers and Sippy Cups Cause Many Injuries 
  • 2012-2013 Flu Vaccine Recommendations 
  • Violence: How to reduce its impact on children 
  • Let’s Move! Child Care Activity Calendar 
  • Asthma Devices 
  • Insect Bites and Stings in the Fall 
  • Special Care Plans—Braedon’s Story 
  • ADHD Treatment for Preschoolers 
  • Emergency Preparedness Manual
  • Influenza Vaccine for 2015-2016
  • Screen Time, Child Development and Nutrition
  • Organic Food – Is It Healthier?
  • Background Music and Noise Interferes with Language Learning?
  • Oral Health Screening Added to Routine Well-Child Visit Schedule
  • National Center on Health—Materials All Early Educators Can Use
  • Increasing Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs
  • Three Newly Revised and a List of All ECELS Self-Learning Modules
  • Eating Together - Mealtime Matters

This form guides collaborative problem-solving involving those who are affected, those with authority, and those with expertise. The form encourages documentation of who is involved, the tasks planned, who is responsible, and checkpoints for follow-up. The attachments include a blank copy of the form and a sample of the completed form to address the problem of a 2 year old child who is biting other children.

The National Institutes of Health funded the development of a set of 11 pre-K health education lessons. The curriculum is called EatPlayGrow. The lessons are about eating right, moving more, getting enough sleep and limiting screen time.

The teaching messages are aligned with widely accepted national pre-K health education standards. U.S Health and Human Services scientists reviewed the curriculum for accuracy. Head Start and preschool centers tested the lessons. The evaluations showed that children, teachers and families adopted some of the desired health behaviors.

Each of the lessons includes key points, art activities, songs, healthy snack ideas, story time activities, suggested physical activities and parent handouts.

To download the free lessons, go to: http://cmom.org/sites/default/files/EatPlayGrowTM_Curriculum.pdf.

This workshop enables the user to learn how to assess health and safety practices in programs for infants and toddlers in conjunction with use of the ITERS assessment tool. Discuss feeding, diapering, sleeping, fostering early brain development, managing illness and more. Use the assessment to make improvements in the program. 

Children are more at risk than adults to the effects of lead because their brains are still growing. Lead exposure can cause problems with the brain. This may lead to learning difficulties and behavior problems. There is no safe level of lead exposure for children. Sources of lead can include old paint, contaminated dust and soil, and water in lead pipes. The most important step is to prevent lead exposure before it occurs.
Children are especially at risk of lead exposure if they:
• live in the inner city or in poverty
• live in a home built before 1978
• have poor nutrition

Early care and education programs can help prevent and reduce lead exposure in the following ways: