• Napping in Child Care Facilities
  • Indoor Air Pollution
  • Obese Preschoolers
  • Fluoride Varnish
  • Isolating Ill Children?
  • Seasonal and H1N1 Influenza Update
  • Spring 2009 Professional Development for Child Care Health Consultants
  • Honoring CCHC Janice Maker
  • Free Kit—Activities, Games & More: Go Out and Play!
  • Organic Foods: Are They Better?
  •  IOM ‘Weighs In’ About Sleep and Obesity
  •  New Online Self-Learning Module—Common Illnesses
  • Social Emotional Development
  •  Pediatricians & Early Educators Share Developmental Screening
  • TICKS Spread Disease
  •  BATS!! - A Health Policy Test

 

  • Influenza Vaccine for 2015-2016
  • Screen Time, Child Development and Nutrition
  • Organic Food – Is It Healthier?
  • Background Music and Noise Interferes with Language Learning?
  • Oral Health Screening Added to Routine Well-Child Visit Schedule
  • National Center on Health—Materials All Early Educators Can Use
  • Increasing Physical Activity in Afterschool Programs
  • Three Newly Revised and a List of All ECELS Self-Learning Modules
  • Eating Together - Mealtime Matters

Learn the basics of food allergy and allergen types in foods and how to prevent a food allergy response.  Use forms, guides, and links to online videos and other materials.  Practice reading food labels to find hidden ingredients that are the same as common food allergens.  Describe how to modify the early learning and school age program for a child with a food allergy and plan for handling a food allergy response.  (ECERS-ITERS: Personal Care Routines. K7.1 C1, K7.5 C1, K7.5 C2, K7.6 C1 ) 6/2017

This workshop uses the interactive curriculum from the Food Allergy Network. It includes a video and mock epinephrine (EpiPen) demonstration. Participants practice reading food labels to find hidden ingredients that are the same as common food allergens and learn the basics of food allergy and allergen types in foods. The group discusses how to modify the child care setting for a child with a food allergy, and a plan for handling a food allergy response. 

The FNIC federal website of the U.S. Department of Agriculture provides a directory to credible, accurate, and practical food and nutrition resources for consumers, nutrition and health professionals, educators and government personnel. You will find links to current obesity prevention websites on the home page of FNIC - Dietary Guidelines for Americans, core messages about healthy eating, Let's Move, My Plate Super Tracker and more. 12/2012

In America, 1 in 6 children may not know where they will get their next meal. The U.S. Department of Agriculture tracks this information. You may not know unless you ask parents about it.  Children without a stable supply of food may develop serious health problems. They may have poor growth and development. They may develop behavior difficulties. They may have frequent illnesses and hospitalizations. Some have iron deficiency anemia. 

View free, online demonstrations of step-by-step, easy ways to prepare foods for children's meals and snacks. Culinary Institute chefs show the proper techniques in 16 print and 51 brief video lessons. The foods are from the United States Department of Agriculture's collection of recipes for schools. The National Food Service Management Institute at the University of Mississippi hosts the website with this excellent professional development resource.

In addition to the videos and print lessons, the website offers six online courses that allow users to earn continuing education credits. The print and video lessons, online courses and USDA recipes are at http://nfsmi.org/Templates/TemplateDefault.aspx?qs=cElEPTIxNg.

Food-borne illness is very common. The risk of this type of illness increases in warm weather. Sending food from home and eating out-of-doors may allow perishable food to reach temperatures that foster bacterial growth. A 2011 study reported in the journal, Pediatrics measured temperatures of lunches that families packed and sent with their preschool children. The researchers found only 1.6% of lunches with perishable items were at safe temperature. The study was done in nine Texas child care centers and measured temperatures in the packed lunches of more than 700 preschoolers. Even when sent with ice packs, most of the lunches were at unsafe temperatures over an hour before the food was ready to be served. The message is clear: Early educators and families must adopt practices that ensure food is at a safe temperature before feeding it to children. 

Question: What determines whether a food is a fruit or a vegetable?  

Answer: Fruits are the part of a plant that has seeds. Vegetables are the edible portion of a plant such as roots (carrots), leaves (lettuce), stems (celery) or flowers (broccoli). They are usually from a plant with a soft (not woody) stem.